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​ It happened too many times that we don’t even realize how much we are slaves to habits. We always started our Instructor Development Course (IDC), with the mundane sign-in sheets, registration forms and everything else required of people who wanted to be certified by New York State as Certified General Topics Instructors. Additionally, we would also introduce ourselves highlighting our qualifications. With post-it notes, fidget toys and plenty of index cards at each table, we wanted to supercharge them from the start. Since the herd instinct is strong, people sitting with those they know from their own commands or their own city agencies, we asked ...
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Reading can be an essential part of your training and a pitfall you will want to avoid. First the positive: As long as people are reading they cannot be daydreaming (at least some of the time). Using the Scavenger Hunt strategy where teams of participants try to find essential information in a bland policy document can be a fun way for them to learn and promote healthy competition. Now the negatives: Instructors who read to participants are inviting daydreams to the nearest Lotto winning fantasy. (Remember, the first time anyone read to you was to put you to sleep). Many of them will be able to read to themselves ...
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​ TRAINING TIP 64:  Five Immutable Facts about Training 1.  If training is the problem, it is not the solution. Training is a solution to a problem; it is not the problem. As Bob Mager      writes in “What Every Manager Should Know about Training,” when you have a headache, it’s a headache. It’s not an      aspirin problem. While it might seem Mr. Mager is dealing in semantics, bad training decisions result in bad training.  2.  If training is the first consideration to solving a problem, it will not solve the problem. This is usually a knee-jerk reflex to a      crisis and the choking death of Staten Islander Eric Garner by a NYPD officer is a perfect ...
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In the summer of 2015 I was teaching Lesson Plan Writing to a class of prospective instructors. I was trying to explain how important chunking was, but I didn’t feel that I was making my point emphatically enough. On the break, I copied a recipe for baking apple pie from Julie Dirksen’s book, “Design for How People Learn.” When the class resumed, I handed out the recipe. Mix together the flour and the salt Chill the butter and water Add the butter to the flour and cut it with a pastry blender until it resembles coarse crumbs. Add enough water until the dough barely hangs together Cut ...
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Mark Twain said it perfectly: “I have been through some terrible things in my life some of which actually occurred.” He could have been describing some people’s approach to public speaking. This fear stems from the speaker making negative predictions that can be traced to three thoughts: 1) What if I make a mistake? You are not going to be perfect. Everyone makes mistakes except 2 nd lieutenants. You might make minor ones such as forgetting something. Targeting yourself for making them is a waste of time and contributes to a self-fulfilling prophecy. Accept it and focus on your training, presentation or speech.   2) What if they don’t like me or ...
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Have you ever stayed up past your point of exhaustion just because a movie or TV show was so interesting, only to have fallen asleep and missed it anyway? It is the same thing in training if you are racing to cover content and skipping the breaks to do it. You will probably be getting various states of unconsciousness from your participants. Breaks are just as important to the training as the topic. If you continue well beyond the participants’ attention span, you may be covering the material but they are no longer learning, and you risk becoming a content-centered instructor who is more interested in the topic than insuring that learning occurs. It’s an ...
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There is a simple formula for making impromptu presentations for the social or business occasion: Before you arrive get mentally prepared that you WILL be invited to speak. That helps remove the shock that puts many people into a panic. Take notes during the main speech or presentation. Focus on two things only: What the speaker’s or presenter’s message means to you. Praise for the speaker’s accomplishment or the presenter’s idea. What the occasion or meeting means to you You can combine a., b., or c. Keep it short. No one expects an impromptu speech or be long, and you don’t have to make it long to be effective. Remember that William ...
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I have often used the following energizer at the start of the afternoon while teaching a leadership class to pre-promotional correction captains. I show participants a real frying pan, a yardstick, and an egg. I tell them that I will drop the egg three feet into the frying pan and the shell will not break. If it does, I add, they may have the afternoon off. I also add that I will not cushion the egg, its fall, or the pan. This is when I usually get peppered with questions e.g. is the egg fresh, or is it hardboiled, or what will they have to do if the shell doesn’t break. (I tell them they will have to take the afternoon class--as punishment). I put the pan ...
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Hi everyone! I'm looking forward to seeing everyone at the Convention. Please stop by the Membership Booth and say hello. I'll also be taking photos for your I Connect profile - so bring your smile along! You will be entered to win a $250.00 gift card! We will also be having some EXCITING new member benefits that we think you're going to love. See you in there!
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Test Blog

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TEST BLOG
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